My Rating – 5 stars (Fiction)

Published on – May 1st 2004

Plot– Amir is the son of a wealthy Kabul merchant, a member of the ruling caste of Pashtuns. Hassan, his servant and constant companion, is a Hazara, a despised and impoverished caste. Their uncommon bond is torn by Amir’s choice to abandon his friend amidst the increasing ethnic, religious, and political tensions of the dying years of the Afghan monarchy, wrenching them far apart. But so strong is the bond between the two boys that Amir journeys back to a distant world, to try to right past wrongs against the only true friend he ever had.The unforgettable, heartbreaking story of the unlikely friendship between a wealthy boy and the son of his father’s servant.

“For you, a thousand times over”

This book had me in a mess when I had finished with it in a day. I never cried over a book like I did for this one . The book has so many emotions that become hard to control and I hard time reading it. Two little friends, an unspeakable secret, and a quest for redemption. “Amir” and “Hassan” are two little boys living in the peaceful Afghanistan of 1975, before the russian invasion, and the subsequent civil wars. Amir is the spoiled son of a wealthy and prominent merchant.  The Kite Runner is a beautifully crafted novel set in a country that is in the process of being destroyed. It is about the power of reading, the price of betrayal, and the possibility of redemption; and an exploration of the power of fathers over sons—their love, their sacrifices, their lies.A sweeping story of family, love, and friendship told against the devastating backdrop of the history of Afghanistan over the last thirty years, The Kite Runner is an unusual and powerful novel that has become a beloved, one-of-a-kind classic. Highly recommendable, very powerful, inexplicably painful. There are books that tell an unique unforgettable story, but there are a few special ones that also have the exceptional quality of transmitting something immensely valuable about the culture of a foreign country; beyond the deeply ideological differences, pros and cons you may find with such society.

Until next time, One of those books which will remain with me for life time and the time memorable, “Zindagi migzara (life goes on)”.

21 thoughts on “Book Review – The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini / Powerful Fiction /

  1. (I have returned once again from yet another hiatus, but anyway) The Kite Runner is the kind of book I’ve always wanted to read but never really thought much of after placing it onto my TBR, and I think your review serves as a sort of reminder that I should check it out soon (in case it’s pushed back into the further future). From your review, I assume that this book will bring about a bout of conflicting emotions. Somehow, I somehow sense that Amir is terribly lonely in some aspects, great review as usual!

    Like

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